The Jordan River Utah Temple (formerly the Jordan River Temple) is the 20th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Located in South Jordan, Utah, it was built with a modern single-spire design.

A site dedication and groundbreaking ceremony were held on June 9, 1979. The ceremony and dedication were presided over by church president Spencer W. Kimball. Instead of the usual small ceremonial shovel-full of dirt at the groundbreaking, Kimball used a large power scoop shovel to begin the building process. The temple was open to the public for tours September 29 through October 31, 1981. Over half a million people toured the temple during its open house.

On August 7, 2015, the LDS Church announced that beginning February 15, 2016, the temple would close for renovations that were anticipated to be completed during the latter part of 2017.[1] A public open house was held from March 17 through April 28, 2018, excluding Sundays and two Saturdays associated with the church's general conference.[2] The temple was rededicated by Henry B. Eyring on May 20, 2018.[3]

Dedication

File:Jordan River Temple.jpg

Jordan River Temple at night.

Marion G. Romney, a member of the church's First Presidency, dedicated the Jordan River Temple in fifteen sessions held during November 16–20, 1981. More than 160,000 members attended the dedicatory services. Thirty of those in attendance at the dedication were elderly men and women who had been at the historic dedication of the first temple in the Salt Lake Valley, the Salt Lake Temple. Most had been very young at the time but still remembered the event. The temple serves Latter-day Saints in Southern Salt Lake County, Utah. Geographically, it is the smallest LDS temple district in the world, but the temple is one of the church's busiest.Template:Citation needed

Features

The temple is the fourth largest LDS temple (but second-largest in Utah) and has a total of Template:Convert, six ordinance rooms, and seventeen sealing rooms. The temple also has the largest capacity, with each ordinance room able to accommodate 125 people. The temple site is Template:Convert. The exterior of the temple is finished with cast stone with white marble chips. Unlike many of the temples, which are built mostly with tithing funds, the Jordan River Temple site was given to the church and all of its construction was paid for by members in the 134 stakes within the temple district. At the time, payment from local building funds was the established practice in the church, but was later abandoned in order to respond to the church's need for temples and church buildings in developing areas of the world.

Temple District

Central Salt Lake County

  1. Bennion Utah Stake
  2. Bennion Utah East Stake
  3. Bennion Utah West Stake
  4. Kearns Utah Stake
  5. Kearns Utah Central Stake
  6. Kearns Utah East Stake
  7. Kearns Utah South Stake
  8. Kearns Utah Western Hills Stake
  9. Midvale Utah Stake
  10. Midvale Utah East Stake
  11. Midvale Utah North Stake
  12. Midvale Utah Union Fort Stake
  13. Midvale Utah Union Park Stake
  14. Murray Utah Stake
  15. Murray Utah Little Cottonwood Stake
  16. Murray Utah North Stake
  17. Murray Utah Parkway Stake
  18. Murray Utah South Stake
  19. Murray Utah West Stake
  20. Murray Utah YSA Stake
  21. Riverton Utah Stake
  22. Riverton Utah Central Stake
  23. Riverton Utah Copperview Stake
  24. Riverton Utah North Stake
  25. Riverton Utah South Stake
  26. Riverton Utah Summerhill Stake
  27. Riverton Utah YSA Stake
  28. Salt Lake Granger Stake
  29. Salt Lake Granger East Stake
  30. Salt Lake Granger North Stake
  31. Salt Lake Granger South Stake
  32. Salt Lake Granger West Stake
  33. Salt Lake Hunter Stake
  34. Salt Lake Hunter Central Stake
  35. Salt Lake Hunter Copperhill Stake
  36. Salt Lake Hunter East Stake
  37. Salt Lake Hunter South Stake
  38. Salt Lake Hunter West Stake
  39. Salt Lake Jordan Stake
  40. Salt Lake Jordan North Stake
  41. Salt Lake Utah Stake (Tongan)
  42. Salt Lake Utah South Stake (Tongan)
  43. Salt Lake Utah West Stake (Tongan)
  44. Sandy Utah Crescent South Stake
  45. Sandy Utah West Stake
  46. South Jordan Utah Stake
  47. South Jordan Utah Country Park Stake
  48. South Jordan Utah Parkway Stake
  49. South Jordan Utah River Stake
  50. South Jordan Utah River Ridge Stake
  51. Taylorsville Utah Stake
  52. Taylorsville Utah Central Stake
  53. Taylorsville Utah North Stake
  54. Taylorsville Utah North Central Stake
  55. Taylorsville Utah South Stake
  56. Taylorsville Utah Valley Park Stake
  57. Taylorsville Utah YSA Stake
  58. West Jordan Utah Stake
  59. West Jordan Utah Bingham Creek Stake
  60. West Jordan Utah East Stake
  61. West Jordan Utah Heritage Stake
  62. West Jordan Utah Mountain Shadows Stake
  63. West Jordan Utah Mountain View Stake
  64. West Jordan Utah River Stake
  65. West Jordan Utah River Oaks Stake
  66. West Jordan Utah Westland Stake
  67. West Jordan Utah YSA Stake


Presidents

Notable presidents of the temple include H. Burke Peterson (1985–87); William Grant Bangerter (1990–93); LeGrand R. Curtis (1996–99); Ben B. Banks (2002–05); and Robert L. Backman (2005–08).

  1. Craig P. Burton 2019–
  2. William A. Schaefermeyer 2014–2019
  3. Robert P. Haight 2011–2014
  4. F. Wayne Chamberlain 2008–2011
  5. Robert L. Backman 2005–2008
  6. Ben B. Banks 2002–2005
  7. Loring M. Hampton 1999–2002
  8. LeGrand R. Curtis 1996–1999
  9. C. Elliott Richards 1993–1996
  10. Wm. Grant Bangerter 1990–1993
  11. John A. Larsen 1987–1990
  12. H. Burke Peterson 1985–1987
  13. Donovan H. Van Dam 1981–1985


See Also

References

Jordan River Temple

Jordanrivertemple5.jpg

The Jordan River Utah Temple is the 20th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Located in South Jordan, Utah, it was built with a modern single-spire design. It is the fourth largest LDS temple (but second-largest in Utah) and has a total of 148,000 sq. ft., six ordinance rooms, and seventeen sealing rooms. The temple also has the largest capacity, with each ordinance room able to accommodate 125 people.

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